Food for Thought: Fear is a Subjective Emotion

Fear is a subjective emotion. We can choose to be ruled by our fear or we can choose to reach beyond our instinctive, individual emotions that drive our fear and look outside of ourselves and all of the things in the world that drive our fears, and see beauty in world.

Everyday the news is subjecting us to the latest stories that fill us with worry, concern, outrage, and fear. Constantly following the news, feeds our fear and plays on the subjective aspects of fear because we a choosing to let our fears control our lives. Not long ago the communication industry was not a 24/7 industry that played so heavily on our psyches.

Step back. Spend less time on social media. Disconnect. Turn off your devices. Free yourself from the outrage machine. Take a break from the news. Get outside. Take a walk. Breathe in the fresh air. Listen to the bird song. Connect with nature. Do anything that is not connected to following the latest news that pummel our senses and leaves us senseless and sometimes riddled with fear.

You can control your fear by replacing it with healthy thoughts and emotions. Be in the moment. Choose happiness over fear.

Namaste

Food for Thought: On Being Busy

Saying I am “Busy,” can signal the need to avoid something unpleasant.

Many people use “busy” as their catch all buzz word to hide their preference to not respond or discuss something that might make them feel uncomfortable. I know I have used it myself on more than one occasion. It is the perfect excuse to get out of anything we don’t want to do.

But using that “busy” excuse gives rise to beg these questions: Continue reading

Hawk Breakfast

There is a small Hawk up in the Shagbark Hickory tree just outside my desk window. I was looking out the window gazing at the River, as I am often wont to do, when it flew onto the lowest branch a few minutes ago and settled in. The sun is behind it and as such, it is hard to make out its coloring and markings, but I knew it was a hawk by the shape of its head when I watched it land.

What I did not see, when it landed, was that it landed with a small bird in its talon. Ah… Breakfast.

Hawk has been busy, sitting there on the tree limb shredding the Small Bird, sending its delicate little feathers to flutter and tumble-down to the ground below the tree.

Given the relatively small size of the hawk, I am thinking it is the same Sharp-shinned Hawk that I have seen in the yard in the past. A Sharp-shinned Hawk is America’s smallest hawk. It has a long tail, long legs and short wings. They are very agile fliers who easily zip in between trees to grab they prey.

One day a few months ago, I looked out the window in front of my desk, to see a hawk sitting in the yew bush right in front of the window. It was quite the surprise for the two of us, actually as I looked out saw the hawk staring in the window at me. “Oh,” I exclaimed, as the hawk ducked back down in the bush and then made its exit through the front of the bush.

A Crow landed in the Maple tree to the left of the Hickory that Hawk sits busily eating breakfast. Now Crow is shrieking at Hawk, demanding that Hawk leave it some dregs of Small Bird. However, Hawk has been up there so long with Small Bird I can’t imagine that he has not stripped the bones clean. There seem to be no more feathers fluttering to the ground. There is just Hawk and his breakfast. He is fastidious in making sure he does not leave a morsel behind.

Finished now, he hops to another branch and sits facing the sun. Pleased as he is to have had a healthy breakfast. Perhaps not as hearty as he liked or needed, his wings lifted and he flew off in the direction of the bird feeder on the other side of the yard. The cycle of nature and life itself, never ceases to amaze me.

Reflections: Affirming Direction

Summer is winding down as the first week of September has brought a preview of the colors of fall to the banks of the Merrimack River and beyond. The other evening after attending the wake of an old friend from high school, I decided to drive down to the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge as I had the camera in the car.

Before I even got to the Refuge, I was struck by the late day light on the west facing wall of the iconic Pink House on the Plum Island Turnpike. I quickly veered off the side of the road, parked my car and grabbed the camera. I took numerous shots with both a 70 – 300 mm zoom and a 10 – 24 mm wide angle (both Nikon).

The light was breathtaking. The wall was illuminated with a golden glow that mingled sweetly with the fall tones of the marsh grasses and brush around the house. As I walked back and forth along the roadside with the camera taking shots from different angles with my two lens I suddenly realized there was a Red-tailed Hawk sitting on the chimney of the house. My spirit bird had come to visit.

Always tuned to the energy of the wild creatures and other forces of nature, I was grateful for the visit of my messenger, the Red-tailed. Continue reading

Food for Thought: Walk On

No matter how difficult life gets, walk on…

Chickadee walking on a stick

We’re here to learn the many lessons of life and to do so we must follow our path no matter how much of an uphill battle it seems to be some times.

Birds tend to be very tenacious creatures. The spend a lot of busy time finding materials to build their nests, shaping and fashioning there nests, and foraging for food. Then when they have found their food they begin their journey back to the nest to feed their little ones.

We humans, do of course follow many of the same patterns in life, on a larger scale.  But sometimes we human tend to get caught up in our woes and then self pity and we shut down rather than walking on despite the obstacles in our path.

In those times when we feel overwhelmed by the sheer magnitude of troubles weighting us down, remember the little chickadee, forging ahead, seed in its beak, heading for its nest. It never stops and thinks I can not do this. It walks… or flies on. Be that tenacious bird on a branch.

Photo: Chickadee on a Branch: Walk On

On the River: Reflections and Motion

As a visual spatial person, I see most everything within the boundaries of a frame. That said, I feel that photography comes naturally to me. Many, many years ago I painted, oils, but I love the fact that with my camera I can instantly create art and channel what I see into something tangible to share with others.

Here in the photos below, I was fascinated by the patterns created by the colors and shapes, mixed with reflection of the building and the motion of both the Mallard ducks and the waters of the Merrimack River at the historic Lowell’s Boat Shop in Amesbury, Massachusetts.